What I am Doing Today

Today is kitchen cleaning day. I decided to remove everything from my kitchen cabinets and clean the shelves. Look at the pictures below to see why.

Shelf with contact paper on being removed.

Shelf with contact paper on being removed.

Dirty inside...  yuk!

Dirty inside… yuk!

Shelf 1 after cleaning

Shelf 1 after cleaning

Amost done

Cabinet 1 almost done. Top shelf still to clean. The bottom shelf was terrible and cleaning didn’t help it. I put the blue non-skid stuff on that shelf.

Done

This cabinet is done. I just have to wait until the dishwasher is done running so I can put the other dishes away.

I still have several more cabinets to tackle. I really don’t think I’ll get them all done today but I’m going to give it a good try.


2 Months

Tomorrow is the 2 month anniversary of quitting smoking. In the past 2 months I have craved but have not smoked cigarettes at all. I am still doing this cold turkey.

I have had a few problems pop up since quitting. I now have acid reflux, which start about 2 weeks after quitting, and I’m trying to control this by not eating the things that are causing a flare up and using over the counter meds until I go to the doctor at the end of this month. I also have an embarrassing problem… excess gas. I’m trying to control that with over the counter meds until the end of the month too.

I’ve also been substituting food for cigarettes, which is not a good thing, and have gained several pounds. That is the next thing I am working on since I have 1 pair of jeans that I can wear now. I had 5 or 6 pair that I could wear before packing on the pounds.

I’m also dealing with my depression meds not working like they were and my psych doc added a new controlled med to the list… the generic for klonopin, which I take as I need it for stress and anxiety. I won’t take them too often because they make me very sleepy and I’m still sleepy into the next day. I won’t be getting addicted to them.


Wednesday Hero

Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder & Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Cedric Hickey
Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder & Chief Aviation Machinist’s Mate Cedric Hickey
U.S. Navy

Chief Damage Controlman Regan Schraeder(Left) and Chief Aviation Machinist’s Mate Cedric Hickey move supplies on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) during a vertical replenishment with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3). Monterey is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy taken by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Billy Ho

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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This post was suggested by Cindy

Theodore Harvey
Theodore Harvey
78 years old from Mescalero Apache Reservation, New Mexico
U.S. Army

Theodore Harvey was only 19 when he enlisted in the Army in 1954. He served with honor for 17 years when was discharged in 1971. Then one day, 41 years later, a social worker at Mr. Harvey’s care center ask him what happened to his medals. “I never got them,” he replied.

You can read more about Theodore Harvey here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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New life

1304984412_img2I have given myself the gift of a whole new life. 10 days ago, on June 9, 2013 I smoked my last cigarette and have not lit another one since.

I am doing this cold turkey this time. I tried many, many times before to quit. I tried with the patch… didn’t work. I tried with Chantix… didn’t work.. I smoked the whole time and it gave me acid reflux, which stopped when I stopped the Chantix. I tried with the fake cigarettes.. didn’t work it just made me want a real one more.

Cold turkey seems to be the best way for me this time because I’m quit longer than I had been when I tried the other methods.

I’ve noticed that things smell and taste different now. Things that smelled or tasted good before either taste/smell even better or a whole lot worse now. I don’t understand how I could have liked these things before that now make me ill to smell/taste them.. lol

I don’t get out of breath quite like I used to and that’s a good thing.

I’ve been on depression meds for awhile now and I think they are helping me cope with the stress of not smoking. It’s not Wellbutrin that I’m taking so that’s not the reason I was able to quit so easily.

When I was growing up in the 50′s and 60′s smoking was glamorized. There were ads of handsome men and beautiful women smoking. TV shows had the actors smoking. It was made out to be like it wasn’t harmful to you at all.. but it really is.

I am taking better care of myself now and stopping smoking is just the 1st step.


Wednesday Hero

Spc. Ross McGinnis
Spc.
Ross McGinnis
19 years old from Knox, Pennsylvania
1st Platoon, C Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment
June 14, 1987 – December 4, 2006
U.S. Army

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life
above and beyond the call of duty:

Private First Class Ross A. McGinnis distinguished himself by acts of
gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while
serving as an M2 .50-caliber Machine Gunner, 1st Platoon, C Company,
1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, in connection with combat
operations against an armed enemy in Adhamiyah, Northeast Baghdad,
Iraq, on 4 December 2006.

That afternoon his platoon was conducting combat control operations in
an effort to reduce and control sectarian violence in the area. While
Private McGinnis was manning the M2 .50-caliber Machine Gun, a
fragmentation grenade thrown by an insurgent fell through the gunner’s
hatch into the vehicle. Reacting quickly, he yelled “grenade,”
allowing all four members of his crew to prepare for the grenade’s
blast. Then, rather than leaping from the gunner’s hatch to safety,
Private McGinnis made the courageous decision to protect his crew. In
a selfless act of bravery, in which he was mortally wounded, Private
McGinnis covered the live grenade, pinning it between his body and the
vehicle and absorbing most of the explosion.

Private McGinnis’ gallant action directly saved four men from certain
serious injury or death. Private First Class McGinnis’ extraordinary
heroism and selflessness at the cost of his own life, above and beyond
the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the
military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and
the United States Army.

You can read more about Spc. McGinnis here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so
others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them
Hero.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When
There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more
information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on
your site, you can go here.

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This Post Was Suggested By Katie

Lt. Alan Wood
Lt. Alan Wood
90 years old from Sierra Madre, Ca.
May 3, 1922 – April 18, 2013
U.S. Navy

Alan Wood didn’t run into a burning building to rescue someone. He isn’t credited with charging into the line of fire or piloting a damaged plane to save the crew. But he did play a role in what has become one of the most iconic images of all time. After nearly a month of heavy fighting U.S forces were able to capture the island of Iwo Jima. A flag was raised to seal the victory. When asked is anyone had a larger flag it was Lt. Wood who was able to provide one and a picture that has come to symbolize the sacrifice and heart of the military was taken. On April 18, Alan Wood passed away at the age of 90.

You can read more about Lt. Alan Wood here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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